High inlet mach combustor for gas turbine engine

Abstract

A combustor for a gas turbine engine is disclosed which is able to operate efficiently at inlet air flows having a high subsonic Mach Number. The combustor has an outer liner and an inner liner spaced therefrom, wherein a combustion chamber is defined therebetween. A dome inlet module is provided which is in flow communication with compressed air flow from a compressor upstream thereof. The dome inlet module has an outer member fixed to the outer liner and an inner member fixed to the inner liner, wherein a flow passage is defined by the outer and inner members for the compressed air flow to flow freely from a compressor to the combustion chamber. Fuel atomizers are then utilized to inject fuel into the flow passage so that the fuel is mixed with the compressed air stream to form a fuel/air mixture which enters the combustion chamber.

Claims

What is claimed is: 1. A combustor for a gas turbine engine having a compressor providing compressed air flow, comprising: (a) an outer liner; (b) an inner liner spaced from said outer liner, wherein a combustion chamber is defined therebetween; (c) a dome inlet module in flow communication with said compressed air flow having an outer member fixed to said outer liner and an inner member fixed to said inner liner, wherein a flow passage is defined therebetween for an air stream to flow from said compressor to said combustion chamber; (d) means for injecting fuel into said flow passage, wherein said fuel mixes with said air stream to form a fuel/air mixture which enters said combustion chamber; and (e) means for igniting and stabilizing a flame within said combustion chamber, said igniting and flame stabilizing means further comprising: (1) a trapped vortex cavity positioned immediately downstream of said dome inlet module; (2) means for injecting air into said trapped vortex cavity; (3) means for injecting fuel into said trapped vortex cavity; and (4) an igniter positioned adjacent to said trapped vortex cavity for igniting said fuel and air therein to produce pilot combustion gases. 2. The combustor of claim 1, wherein said compressed air flow has a velocity at a high subsonic Mach Number. 3. The combustor of claim 1, said dome inlet module further comprising a plurality of vanes positioned circumferentially within said flow passage, said vanes providing at least some degree of residual swirl to said air stream flowing through said flow passage. 4. The combustor of claim 1, wherein said outer and inner members of said dome inlet module are shaped to provide low area ratio diffusion of said air stream. 5. The combustor of claim 1, wherein the fuel/air mixture entering said combustion chamber has a bulk flow velocity greater than 200 feet per second. 6. The combustor of claim 1, wherein the fuel/air mixture entering said combustion chamber has a bulk flow velocity in a range of approximately 300 feet per second to approximately 600 feet per second. 7. The combustor of claim 1, said dome inlet module further comprising at least one circumferential splitter positioned within said flow passage, wherein said air stream is partitioned into a plurality of parallel air streams to provide additional shear layers. 8. The combustor of claim 1, further comprising means for igniting and stabilizing a flame within said combustion chamber. 9. The combustor of claim 8, said igniting and flame stabilizing means comprising: (a) a trapped vortex cavity positioned immediately downstream of said dome inlet module; (b) means for injecting air into said trapped vortex cavity; (c) means for injecting fuel into said trapped vortex cavity; and (d) an igniter positioned adjacent to said trapped vortex cavity for igniting said fuel and air therein to produce pilot combustion gases. 10. The combustor of claim 1, said trapped vortex cavity having a substantially rectangular shape with one side open to said combustion chamber. 11. The combustor of claim 1, wherein said air and fuel is injected into said trapped vortex cavity in a direction opposite to said fuel/air mixture entering said combustion chamber. 12. The combustor of claim 1, wherein said trapped vortex cavity is incorporated into said outer liner. 13. The combustor of claim 12, wherein a second trapped vortex cavity is incorporated into said inner liner. 14. The combustor of claim 13, further comprising a second diffusing passage positioned radially inside said dome inlet module and in flow communication with said compressor, wherein a second portion of said compressed air is supplied to said inner passage. 15. The combustor of claim 12, further comprising a plurality of cooling passages in said outer liner trapped vortex cavity walls, wherein said fuel/air vortex flow is reinforced and combustion of said fuel/air vortex is enhanced in said cavity. 16. The combustor of claim 12, further comprising: (a) a casing around said combustor, wherein an outer passage is formed between said casing and said outer liner and an inner passage is formed between said casing and said inner liner; and (b) a first diffusing passage positioned radially outside said dome inlet module and in flow communication with said compressor, wherein a first portion of said compressed air is supplied to said outer passage. 17. The combustor of claim 1, said fuel injection means further comprising: (a) a fuel supply; (b) a fuel manifold positioned around said dome inlet module; (c) a fuel passage in flow communication with said fuel supply at a first end and said fuel manifold at a second end; and (d) a plurality of passages in flow communication with said fuel manifold and said flow passage; wherein fuel flows from said fuel supply to said fuel manifold and is thereafter supplied into said flow passage by said passages. 18. The combustor of claim 17, further comprising a plurality of hollow vanes positioned circumferentially within said flow passage, said vanes being in flow communication with said fuel manifold, wherein atomizers are positioned within passages in said vanes. 19. The combustor of claim 17, further comprising: (a) a trapped vortex cavity incorporated into said outer liner immediately downstream of said dome inlet module; (b) means for injecting fuel and air into said trapped vortex cavity to generate a fuel/air vortex therein; (c) an igniter to ignite said fuel/air vortex to produce pilot combustion gases. 20. The combustor of claim 17, said fuel injecting means further comprising: (a) a fuel passage in flow communication with said fuel manifold and a trapped vortex cavity manifold; and (b) a fuel injector positioned in a wall of said trapped vortex cavity in flow communication with said trapped vortex cavity manifold. 21. The combustor of claim 20, said air injecting means comprising at least one passage in said trapped vortex cavity wall adjacent said fuel injector. 22. The combustor of claim 21, said air injecting means comprising a plurality of passages spaced around said fuel injector. 23. The combustor of claim 21, said fuel injector having a slot-shaped opening for injection of said fuel and said air injecting means comprising at least one row of air passages formed above and below said slotted opening, wherein said fuel spray is spread circumferentially in said trapped vortex cavity. 24. A combustor for a gas turbine engine having a compressor providing compressed air flow, comprising: (a) an outer liner; (b) an inner liner spaced from said outer liner, wherein a combustion chamber is defined therebetween; (c) a dome inlet module in flow communication with said compressed air flow having an outer member fixed to said outer liner and an inner member fixed to said inner liner, wherein a flow passage is defined therebetween for an air stream to flow from said compressor to said combustion chamber, said dome inlet module further comprising a plurality of vanes positioned circumferentially within said flow passage; and (d) means for injecting fuel into said flow passage, wherein said fuel mixes with said air stream to form a fuel/air mixture which enters said combustion chamber; wherein said vanes have a blunt trailing edge to generate wakes and shear layers within said flow passage, whereby mixing of said fuel with said air stream is enhanced. 25. A combustor for a gas turbine engine having a compressor providing compressed air flow, comprising (a) an outer liner; (b) an inner liner spaced from said outer liner, wherein a combustion chamber is defined therebetween; (c) a dome inlet module in flow communication with said compressed air flow having an outer member fixed to said outer liner and an inner member fixed to said inner liner, wherein a flow passage is defined therebetween for an air stream to flow from said compressor to said combustion chamber; (d) means for injecting fuel into said flow passage, wherein said fuel mixes with said air stream to form a fuel/air mixture which enters said combustion chamber; (e) a casing around said combustor, wherein an outer passage is formed between said casing and said outer liner and an inner passage is formed between said casing and said inner liner; (f) a heat exchanger positioned adjacent said casing; (g) a bleed opening adjacent said dome inlet module for diverting a portion of said compressed air; (h) an entry duct for channeling said portion of said compressed air into said heat exchanger; (i) a fuel passage to said heat exchanger, wherein said fuel entering said heat exchanger cools said compressed air entering said heat exchanger; and (j) an exit duct for channeling said cooled compressed air into said outer passage and a hollow turbine nozzle positioned immediately downstream of said combustion chamber, wherein a portion of said cooled compressed air enters said outer passage and a portion of said cooled compressed air flows through said turbine nozzle and into said inner passage.
The Government has rights to this invention pursuant to Contract No. F33615-93-C-2305 awarded by the United States Air Force. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION 1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to a combustor for a gas turbine engine and, more particularly, to a combustor for a gas turbine engine having a compact design which operates efficiently at inlet air flows having a high subsonic Mach Number. 2. Description of Related Art Advanced aircraft gas turbine engine technology requirements are driving the combustors therein to be shorter in length, have higher performance levels over wider operating ranges, and produce lower exhaust pollutant emission levels. To achieve this, such combustion system designs have become considerably more complex and costly compared with current technology combustion systems. For example, combustors having multiple annular dome configurations, such as the double annular combustor disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,197,278 to Sabla et al. and the triple annular combustor disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,323,604 to Eckstedt et al., have evolved which evidence the complexity of such advanced combustion systems. While these combustor designs are able to perform in accordance with their stated objectives, they are complex in design, generally requiring complicated fuel staging modes to maintain stability over their intended operating range and involve a substantial number of sub-assemblies for pre-mixing air and fuel in order to achieve a desired reduction in gas turbine emissions. Further, such combustor designs continue to be concerned with auto-ignition within the mixers and generally have involved an overall increase in the height and weight of the combustion system. Accordingly, it would be desirable for a gas turbine engine combustor to be developed which avoids the problems associated with multiple annular combustors. Further, it would be desirable if the combustor could be more compact in both height and length, as well as substantially reduce combustion system pressure loss. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION In accordance with one aspect of the present invention, a combustor for a gas turbine engine is disclosed which is able to operate efficiently at inlet air flows having a high subsonic Mach Number. The combustor has an outer liner and an inner liner spaced therefrom, wherein a combustion chamber is defined therebetween. A dome inlet module is provided which is in flow communication with a compressor immediately upstream thereof. The dome inlet module has an outer member fixed to the outer liner and an inner member fixed to the inner liner, wherein a flow passage is defined between the outer and inner members for compressed air to flow freely from the compressor to the combustion chamber. Fuel injectors are then utilized to inject fuel into the flow passage so that the fuel is mixed with the compressed air flow to form a fuel/air mixture which enters the combustion chamber. In accordance with a second aspect of the present invention, a plurality of vanes are positioned circumferentially within the flow passage of the dome inlet. The vanes have a blunt trailing edge to generate wakes and shear layers within the flow passage and downstream within the combustion chamber in order to enhance mixing of injected fuel with the compressed air flow. The vanes also may be hollow with atomizers positioned within a plurality of openings in the pressure and suction surfaces of the vanes, with the vanes being in flow communication with a fuel manifold positioned around the outer member of the dome inlet module. In accordance with a third aspect of the present invention, one or more circumferential splitters are positioned within the flow passage of the dome inlet module, wherein the compressed air flow is partitioned into a plurality of parallel air flows to provide additional shear layers therein. In accordance with a fourth aspect of the present invention, means for stabilizing the flame in the combustion chamber is provided in the form of a trapped vortex cavity incorporated into the outer liner immediately downstream of the dome inlet module. Air and fuel are injected into the trapped vortex cavity, where a fuel/air vortex is formed therein and ignited to supply stable pilot combustion gases. A second trapped vortex cavity may be incorporated into the inner liner of the combustor immediately downstream of the dome inlet module in order to further stabilize the flame in the combustion chamber. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING While the specification concludes with claims particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the present invention, it is believed that the same will be better understood from the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing in which: FIG. 1 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of a combustor in accordance with the present invention; FIG. 2 is a longitudinal cross-sectional view of an alternate embodiment of a combustor in accordance with the present invention; FIG. 3 is a partial perspective aft view of the dome inlet module and upstream end of the combustion chamber taken along line 3--3 of FIG. 2; FIG. 4 is a partial front view of an aft wall in the outer liner trapped vortex cavity depicted in FIGS. 1-3; FIG. 5 is a partial front view of an alternate embodiment for an aft wall in the outer liner trapped vortex cavity depicted in FIGS. 1-3; FIG. 6 is an enlarged, longitudinal cross-sectional view of part of the outer liner trapped vortex cavity and associated fuel injector depicted in FIGS. 1-4; FIG. 7 is a schematic perspective view of a vane positioned in the flow passage of the dome inlet module depicted in FIGS. 1-3; and FIG. 8 is a partial cross-sectional view of the vane depicted in FIG. 7 taken along line 8--8. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Referring now to the drawing in detail, wherein identical numerals indicate the same elements throughout the figures, FIGS. 1 and 2 depict a combustor 10 of the present invention which comprises a hollow body defining a combustion chamber 12 therein. Combustor 10 is generally annular in form about an axis 14 and is further comprised of an outer liner 16, an inner liner 18, and a dome inlet module designated generally by the numeral 20. A casing 22 is preferably positioned around combustor 10 so that an outer radial passage 24 is formed between casing 22 and outer liner 16 and an inner passage 26 is defined between casing 22 and inner liner 18. More specifically, it will be recognized that dome inlet module 20 reflects an effort to combine the individual diffuser, the fuel injector, and dome components of a standard annular combustor, while eliminating the need for a plurality of fuel/air mixers specifically designed and implemented for that task. By integrating the diffuser/fuel injector/mixer/dome functions into a single module, the length of combustor 10 is able to be substantially reduced (e.g., up to 35% of the length of a standard annular combustor). It will be seen in FIGS. 1 and 2 that dome inlet module 20 is in flow communication with an exit end 28 of a compressor positioned upstream thereof. Accordingly, a substantial portion of the compressed air flow produced by the upstream compressor (80-90% in FIG. 1; approximately 50% in FIG. 2), as depicted by arrow 30 enters dome inlet module 20. Another portion of the compressed air flow produced by the upstream compressor is depicted by an arrow 32 in FIG. 1, and will be discussed in greater detail hereinafter. Likewise, air flow depicted by arrows 31 and 33 are directed into outer and inner passages 24 and 26, and will be discussed hereinafter. With respect to compressed air flow 30, it will be understood that it preferably has a high subsonic Mach Number flow (i.e., in a range of 0.3-0.5 Mach Number). Since dome inlet module 20 is absent of any swirl cups, premixers, or the like, it will be understood that compressed air flow 30 is generally able to flow freely through dome inlet module 20 into combustion chamber 12. By eliminating the high pressure loss mixing devices of prior art combustors, dome inlet module 20 is able to reduce the overall combustor total pressure loss (from compressor discharge to turbine nozzle inlet) by up to 50% when compared with conventional designs. Since it is desirable to provide some degree of residual swirl to compressed air flow 30, a plurality of hollow vanes 34 are preferably positioned circumferentially within a flow passage 36 defined by an outer member 38 and an inner member 40 of dome inlet module 20. Vanes 34 provide a mechanical load path within flow passage 36 in much the same way as struts do for a conventional diffuser. In this way, vanes 34 are able to maintain some degree of residual swirl (or completely de-swirl the flow if desired), so that the benefits thereof from the upstream compressor are passed along to a turbine downstream of combustor 10. In particular, it will be recognized that such residual swirl allows for a reduction in the required number of turbine inlet nozzle vanes, one of which is shown in FIGS. 1 and 2 and identified by the numeral 42. This, in turn, reduces turbine nozzle cooling requirements and enables an improvement in specific fuel consumption by the engine. In order to provide fuel into flow passage 36 of dome inlet module 20, whereby it can be mixed with compressed air flow 30 flowing therethrough, it is preferred that vanes 34 have a hollow configuration (as best seen in FIG. 7) which is in flow communication with a fuel manifold 44 positioned adjacent and around outer member 38 of dome inlet module 20. A passage 46 is utilized to provide fuel from a fuel supply (not shown) to fuel manifold 44. It will be understood, as seen from FIGS. 7 and 8, that fuel from fuel manifold 44 enters a hollow area 48 within each vane 34 and is thereafter injected into flow passage 36 through atomizers 50 positioned within a plurality of passages 52 formed in the suction and pressure-surfaces of vane 34 (an example of an atomizer 50 positioned within passage 52 in suction surface 53 is depicted in FIG. 8). As seen in FIGS. 3 and 7, the trailing edges 54 of vanes 34 preferably are somewhat blunt in shape to generate waves and shear layers in fuel flow passage 36 so that mixing of fuel compressed air flow 30 is enhanced. In order to provide the desired amount of mixing of fuel and air within flow passage 36 of dome inlet module 20, the number of vanes 34 provided would typically be on the order of the number of compressor outlet guide vanes used in a conventional combustor design approach (e.g., approximately 100 to 120 vanes). The mixing of fuel and air within flow passage 36 is then able to be accomplished rapidly due to a large number (approximately 1,000) of individual injection sources in dome inlet module 20 and the shear layers that develop in compressed air flow 30 downstream of vanes 34. As best seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, flow passage 36 formed by outer and inner members 38 and 40, respectively, of dome inlet module 20 generally has a shape in the form of a low area ratio diffuser. By so designing dome inlet module 20, the overall combustion system length is able to be reduced up to 35%. Moreover, the low diffusion level coupled with the high inlet flow velocity of compressed air flow 30 results in bulk flow velocities of the fuel/air mixture entering combustion chamber 12 that are much higher than for a conventional combustor (e.g., in a range of 300-600 feet per second). This high level of bulk flow velocity creates a desirable condition in which combustion cannot be initiated within flow passage 36 of dome inlet module 20, preventing a situation in which damage or failure of module 20 could occur due to the presence of hot combustion gasses formed by autoignition. Consequently, this allows the injection of fuel into compressed air flow 30 within flow passage 36, which provides a degree of distance and time for the fuel to mix with compressed air flow 30 before the resulting fuel/air mixture enters combustion chamber 12. However, this difficulty of achieving and sustaining combustion in such a high velocity flow is carried downstream into combustion chamber 12 as well. Accordingly, to overcome this problem within combustion chamber 12, some means for igniting the fuel/air mixture and stabilizing the flame thereof is required. Preferably, this is accomplished by the incorporation of a trapped vortex cavity depicted generally by the number 56, formed at least in outer liner 16. Cavity 56 is utilized to provide a trapped vortex of fuel and air, which is ignited as necessary by an igniter 58 through an ignition port. It will be understood that the concept of a trapped vortex in and of itself is known in the art, as evidenced by a paper entitled "Performance of A Trapped-Vortex Combustor," by K.-Y. Hsu, L. T. Goss, D. D. Trump of Systems Research Labs, Inc. in Dayton, Ohio and W. M. Roquemore of Wright Laboratory at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio. However, as seen therein, the trapped vortex was formed within a centerbody member so that the fuel/air mixture flowed radially around a plurality of trapped vortices. In the present invention, trapped vortex cavity 56 is incorporated into outer liner 16 immediately downstream of dome inlet module 20, and preferably within inner liner 18 as well. Trapped vortex cavity 56 preferably is substantially rectangular in shape, with it being open to combustion chamber 12, so that it is formed by an aft wall 62, a forward wall 64, and an outer wall 66 formed therebetween which preferably is substantially parallel to outer liner 16. Fuel enters trapped vortex cavity 56 through a fuel injector 68, which is centered within a passage 70 in aft wall 62. Fuel injector 68, which is in flow communication with an outer fuel manifold 74 that receives fuel by means of a conduit 72, preferably is the type which is threaded into fuel manifold 74 (see FIG. 6). Fuel injector 68 has a flange portion 76 which rests against aft wall 62 and preferably is retained by a ferrule 78 or other similar device since passage 70 is somewhat oversized to allow for thermal growth of fuel injector 68. It will also be seen from FIG. 6 that fuel manifold 74 preferably has an insulating layer 80 in order to protect fuel manifold 74 from the heat experienced thereby, insulating layer 80 having either air or some other insulating material therein. Air is injected into trapped vortex cavity 56 by means of one or more passages 82 formed in aft wall 62 which preferably are positioned around fuel passage 70. As seen in FIG. 4, passages 82 are formed circumferentially around passage 70 in a square configuration since it is contemplated that fuel injector 68 will provide the fuel in a conical spray 71. It will be understood that any number of air passages 82 may be provided in any number of patterns, but that it is desirable that air passages 82 collectively form a surrounding sheet of air to rapidly mix with the fuel injected into trapped vortex cavity 56 and prevent the injected fuel from mixing with the air and being included within a boundary layer along aft wall 62, forward wall 64, and outer wall 66. It will be noted that in FIG. 5 an alternative configuration for the injection of fuel and air into trapped vortex cavity 56 is provided. In this embodiment, fuel injector 68 injects fuel into cavity 56 in a thin fan spray 95 by means of a slot-shaped opening 96. Upper and lower rows of air passages 98 are formed in aft wall 62 in order to encourage the circumferential spreading of fuel entering cavity 56. As noted hereinabove, air passages 98 are situated in order to preferably provide sheets of air above and below the fuel entering cavity 56 in order to separate the fuel from aft wall 62, forward wall 64 and outer wall 66, as well as to better encourage the trapped vortex flow within cavity 56. To further assist in the prevention of fuel from being located along the boundary layer of trapped vortex cavity 56, as well as assist in producing the desired trapped vortex of fuel and air within cavity 56, a plurality of cooling holes 84 are formed within aft wall 62, a plurality of cooling holes 86 are formed within outer wall 66, and a plurality of cooling holes 88 are formed within forward wall 64. It will be noted that cooling holes 84, 86 and 88 are angled to help promote the trapped vortex of fuel and air to be formed within cavity 56. It will also be noted that due to the entrance of air in cavity 56 from air passages 82 formed in aft wall 62, as well as cooling holes 84, 86 and 88, the direction of the trapped vortex within cavity 56 will be opposite that of the fuel/air mixture entering combustion chamber 12 from dome inlet module 20. Accordingly, the combustion gases generated by the trapped vortex within cavity 56 provide a continuous ignition and stabilization source for the fuel/air mixture entering combustion chamber 12. As best seen in FIG. 3, the flow of trapped vortex combustion gases, as depicted by dashed lines 90, flow adjacent the downstream end of dome inlet module 20 resulting in close circumferential spacing to effectively reduce the distance for the flame to spread within the fuel/air mixture entering combustion chamber 12. Spreading of the flame through such fuel/air mixture is also enhanced by the shear mixing layers generated by the wakes off vanes 34 of dome inlet module 20. As an additional enhancement to spreading the flame provided by the trapped vortex in cavity 56, one or more circumferential splitters 92 (see FIGS. 1 and 3) may be provided within flow passage 36 of dome inlet module 20 between adjacent vanes 34 in order to partition compressed air flow 30 and subsequently the fuel/air mixture into a plurality of parallel streams. Splitters 92 provide additional shear mixing layers and further enhance the combustion process within combustion chamber 12 since a trailing edge 94 thereof provides a surface in which combustion gases 90 can further migrate at the downstream end of dome inlet module 20. It will be seen that circumferential splitters 92 preferably have a design in which its leading edge is lesser in thickness than its trailing edge 94, with trailing edge 94 having a somewhat blunt shape similar to trailing edge 54 of vanes 34 in order to promote wakes and shear mixing layers. As seen in FIGS. 1 and 2, different cooling air schemes are provided therein. In FIG. 1, a heat exchanger 100 is provided which is positioned adjacent casing 22. A bleed opening 102 is provided between dome inlet module 20 and a forward wall 104 so that compressed air flow 32 can be bled therethrough and into an entry duct 106 in flow communication with heat exchanger 100. It will be seen in FIG. 1 that a fuel line 108 from a fuel supply (not shown) enters heat exchanger 100 and exits through a fuel passage consistent with fuel passage 46 shown in FIG. 2. An exit duct 110 carries air flow 32 therethrough, which has been cooled by means of the temperature difference with the fuel circulated through heat exchanger 100. Exit duct 110 extends generally along casing 22 and opens principally into a hollow passage 112 within turbine inlet nozzle vane 42 so that the cooled air flow cools it. Thereafter, the cooled air flow continues into inner passage 26 in order to supply cooling air to inner liner 18 and the air necessary for the trapped vortex in an inner cavity 114 provided within inner liner 18 immediately downstream of inlet module 20. It will be seen that inner cavity 114 has an aft wall 115, a forward wall 117, and an inner wall 119 substantially parallel to inner liner 18, with cooling holes 121, 123, and 125 therein, respectively. Fuel is supplied to an inner fuel manifold 128 by means of a conduit 130 which is in flow communication with hollow area 48 of vanes 34 in dome inlet module 20. Another portion of the cooled air flow from exit duct 110 enters outer passage 24 in order to supply cooling air to outer liner 16 and the air for formation of the trapped vortex cavity 56. in FIG. 2, an outer diffusing passage 118 and an inner diffusing passage 120 are provided adjacent dome inlet module 20 in order to supply air to outer and inner passages 24 and 26, respectively. It will be seen that outer and inner diffusing passages 118 and 120 are in flow communication with exit end 28 of the compressor upstream of combustor 10 so that portions 31 and 33 of the compressed air provided is split with dome inlet module 20. Further, it will be noted in this configuration that outer and inner bleed shields 122 and 124 are provided adjacent outer and inner walls 66 and 119 of outer cavity 56 and inner cavity 114. Bleed shields 122 and 124 are provided because cooling passages 86 and 125 formed in outer and inner walls 66 and 119 are formed opposite the direction of flow thereto and bleed shields 122 and 124 cause stagnation of such flow so that it may be turned to flow through such passages 86 and 125. In the same regard, it will be noted that compressed air flowing into outer and inner passages 24 and 26 will be captured at forward walls 64 and 117 by a cowl 126 So that air will flow through passages 88 and 123. Likewise, compressed air flowing into outer and inner passages 24 and 26 will be flowing in the same direction as cooling slots within outer and inner liners 16 and 18, respectively, but also will be turned therein so as to supply air to air passages 82 or 98 formed in aft walls 62 and 115, as well as cooling holes 84 and 121, respectively. Having shown and described the preferred embodiment of the present invention, further adaptations of the combustor can be accomplished by appropriate modifications by one of ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope of the invention.

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